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this and argue with your notion that the two wars, iraq and afghanistan, in leading us into them that, that was successful. chris: that was successful -- >> but those wars defined his presidency and we do not know the outcome of either of them. i remember asking bush once, how do you think history will judge your iraq war? he stood in the oval office, shrugged through his hands in the air and said, history we won't know. we will all be dead. this is quite true. >> when he first came in, he had theowest pectationsiminable. he would be an inconsequential one-term president. don't forget then 9/11 happened and there was a time as we all remember after 9/11 when he had soaring popularity ratings. the world was and country was bound and then the iraq war and everything changed after that. >> i think the america public made judgment but history has not yet on the iraq war and the judgment is overwhelmingly negative. i think to a great degree, look at george w. bush's popularity rating now, which is still not high, it's defined not only by the war but also by the economy. and he left his pre
of casualties in afghanistan is not only smaller than iraq, but it's much smaller than vietnam or korea or world war i or world war ii. and as a practical matter, the serious fighting has only gone on for the last four or five years. we did another study at rand which looked at what are the prospects for winning a counterinsurgency, and there are a number of elements that have to be in place to give you a reasonable prospect of winning a counterinsurgency campaign. once you have all of those elements in place, which are not just resource elements, they're also policy elements, dock -- dock tribal elements, it usually takes seven years for them to actually turn the tide and begin to definitively defeat the enemy. well, i don't think anybody would argue we had those elements in place anytime before 2009, 2010 in afghanistan. so i think one as to put in some perspective the concern that this is the longest war we've ever fought, and we're getting tired of it, and we have to leave. nevertheless, i think things have gone wrong. i don't disagree with many of the more tactical points that raj made abou
. you as one of the people trying to petition we have to invade iraq and overthrow saddam by force. is also a number of the defense policy advisory board. and so he goes over to iraq. he's the only member of this board that goes their indices it's a disaster. there's an insurgency mounted and nobody knows what to do about it. now, he comes back feeling really upset because, feeling pangs of guilt because he was advising this administration. he had advocated for this war. his son had recently joined the army and is going to be sent to iran. -- iraq tickets can be said to dismiss. that he sort of help create. so he thinks, well, he has to do something about this. so he sets up a similar in vermont and he goes through his rolodex answer is military journal but he invites everybody to be confined who has written anything remotely interesting about the subject of water. and he comes up with about 30. and they all assembled for five days to discuss these things. the pivotal think about this meeting is not so much what they discussed as that they met. most of these people didn't know each
in afghanistan? in my view, strategy has not worked. in iraq, in afghanistan, and let's look at the cost very quickly. you have to look at both of these together. first with iraq. ambassador dobbin mentioned some of the better things that have come out of the war in afghanistan. let me set that within another set of figures. with iraq, after 8.8 years of war, 4480 six americans killed, thousands more with life- changing wounds. depending on which estimate you want to take, close to 3 trillion american dollars spent. close to a quarter of a million iraqis killed. that many more are seriously wounded or close to a million displaced from their homes, very few have returned. we replaced one strong-arm later with another. this one is allied closely with our regional adversary, iran. then we look at afghanistan. close to 2200 americans killed. that many more seriously wounded. posted $1 trillion spent. tens of thousands of afghans killed. i've asked myself this hypothetical, just to try to set in context what these wars have costs relative to what we have achieved. if the united states and gone int
to mass produce serin in the cold war. the war between iran and iraq waged through the 1980s, they used serin in combat against the iranians and famously used serin and mustard gas both in world war i, saddam used serin and mustard gas in 1988 against his own iraqi people. he bombed the civilian iraq kurdish population. he bombed them with serin and mustard gas. the death toll from that attack was estimated in the thousands. serin is technically illegal now. an international chemical weapons convention banned it in 1983. not every country in the world signedton that convention. angola, north korea, egypt, the new country of south sudan, somalia and syria have not touched the weapons convention that banned it. that last country, syria, is thought to have the largest stocks of serin in the whole world. syria started making chemical weapons in ernest in the 1970s and really stepped it up in then 1980s, a strategic decision made by the assad government. for whatever reason now the assad government has huge stockpiles of chemical weapons. in the bloody civil war raging for two years in syria
of troops in the beginning and redirecting our energies to iraq, he enabled the top and to resurface. the second explanation for what went wrong was the president barack obama correctly shifted america's focus back to afghanistan but failed to solely resource submissions for any comment involvement -- for any combat involvement. the project to create a viable, centralized government may have been the moved to failure from the very beginning. proceduralped up in questions about planning and execution. we really challenge the underlying source -- the underlying assumption that we could ever promote reconciliation, lasting peace, or build a capable government. in addition to what seems to be vulnerabilities in afghanistan, president obama release that establishing rule of law, a growing economy, eliminating corruption, and resolve a dispute was somehow prevent another terrorist attack on american soil. rebuilding afghanistan to cure the problem of terrorism is fallacious, costly, -- states has pumped hundreds of billions of dollars into the world topos poorest economies. we created winn
what our government has been doing. we go to the region and we go to iraq and afghanistan and iran. , and we seept, gaza things for ourselves. we come back and see our government is in a different reality. the american people thought saddam hussein was responsible for the attacks at the world trade center. we went there and we saw people weapons there were no of mass destruction. there is no reason to go to war. halls of get into the our government and into their offices. we are trying to tell the we should not go against -- we should not go to war against a country that has not attacked us. we tried to go to other venues. some of those venues are congressional hearings. it is one of the few places where we can see our elected officials and get our message across. we get arrested all the time at these hearings. it is not fun. we do not take that lightly. i got arrested in a hearing of a judiciary committee for going like this -- for holding up a peace sign. we do not do this because we like to. do this because we fill obligated as u.s. citizens. >> how many were in the room? >> abo
, they have insisted on bringing their own combat aviation to fight. if you look at iraq and afghanistan, there were persistent on bringing their own helicopters, their own jets. the marines, their desire to bring their own aircraft, going to part of the country that was far less significant than where they should have gone. it is that same thinking that drives the marines to want the f-35. we need to have the same kind of combat aviation gear force on the marines do. do they really? the marine corps really need to be able to participate in the first strike attack? those of the fundamental questions that members of congress do not really talk about when it comes to looking at programs like this. >> has the navy landed one of these f-35 carriers yet? >> no. >> the actual plane is never seen with the arresting gear. ♪ >> that is from the lockheed martin website. >> they have not designed the appropriate -- it is complex engineering, but to be able to catch the arresting wires. the way the plane is designed, the hook has to be far from the back and that creates its own set of challenges.
's invasion of iraq. nothing written or said better explains the resulting folly than rajiv's book, life in the emrad city, the green zone. and yesterday again, rajiv, gives us detail, the new book, "little america." right now these days, a short-term sequester to find $80 billion, but over the next decade we have to scrape up three to five trillion, which is just about what we managed to squander on an iraq war that left so many dead and so many more people who hate us. so let's start there. in the front piece of imperial city, he quotes t.e. lawrence who advised his british superiors in 1917, do not try to do too much with your own hands. better the arabs do it tolerably than you do it perfectly. its their war and you're there to help them. under the very odd conditions of arabia, your practical work will not be as good as perhaps you think it is. and among the flood of -- from the much lamented molly eye vans who says it's like reading a horror novel. you want to put your face down and moen, -- moan, how could we have been so stupid? we had this invasion, and a few of the reporters in
weapons was totally disproved in iraq. even if they have them. i don't mean so what. obviously people should not be using chemical weapons. rules of warfare i find to be farcical as an idea in general the idea that there are weapons that you can use and weapons that you can't if we want to use chemical weapons we would. if syria is going to use them they will. >> cenk: i hardly agree but mainly disagree. the part i agree with, look, we use the uranium in iraq. we used white phosphorous in fallujah and the birth defect rate was 20% higher than hiroshima and nagasaki. we should follow our own rules. and i think the rules of wars are very important. if you enforce it from time to time, it makes people a little more reluctant to go cross that red line. if we led assad cross the red line now the next dictate who are is having a little bit of trouble, if he has chemical buy localbiological weapons, press the button. they never did anything about it. >> but we learned from iraq that going to war over the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction didn't work. i'm not saying that we shouldn
was freedom. repeating that over and over. the one word he did not utter was iraq. never heard it today. the president getting emotional as he wrapped up his speech. joining me here in dallas is david gregory, moderator of nbc's "meet the press." chuck todd, nbc's political director and host of msnbc's "the daily rundown." politico's jonathan martin. wane slater, senior political writer for "dallas morning news." and the author. book "bush's brain." and joining us is michael reagan and michael beschloss, you will hear from all of them now. david, this was quite a day. i didn't expect it would go so well, but i think it has. >> i think it has gone well. there's an enormous amount of politeness at an event like this. we've talked about it. there is a common bond between these former presidents and current president, as president obama said. they're more like a support group than a club. because it reflects the fact that politics is one thing, governing and the presidency is hard. i think having covered president bush for eight years i'm willing to go out on a limb and say that i do believ
in iraq. joining me now lawrence korb, senior fell low at the center for american progress and former assistant secretary of defense he joins us from washington, d.c. larry, welcome inside "the war room"." >> it's good to be back. >> michael: how much does the legacy of iraq weigh on him in syria? >> i think a great deal. again if you take a look at what the letter to senator levin said, it basically looks like it, it's sort of a high degree of confidence, but we haven't established a chain of custody. yes, there is evidence that sari sarin was used. this could have been used by any of the groups who are anxious to get us in. and in iraq the inspectors were back in, they couldn't find anything, but bush went ahead any way. i think that's the case. then we found out too late after we're already in there with 150,000 men and women and devastated iraqi society. >> michael: do you think then, senators graham and mccain are jumping the gun crossing the led red line too quickly or is this the proper thing for the white house to look into or are they asking for action without looking furthe
as we know iraq and how that had gone so there is questions in senators' minds, i believe. when we watch this whole thing unfold in syria right now, we look at syria from the standpoint do we send troops in. there is people advocating that. do we give all of the support we can to the allies there who are the neighbors are syria that have the most to lose. the refugee problem that is tremendous concern to all of us. with all that being said, i do not -- i would not support boots on the ground. supportport total yo is survis as far as humanitarian aid to jordan. >> chris: no fly zone, arming the rebels. >> coordinate with nato and with the neighbors and allies over there to their best interest. i will really believe that. >> chris: all right. finally, senator manchin you and fellow republican pat toomey were the coauthors of the expanded background check that was voted down a few days ago in the senate. you are talking now you you are talking about revising the bill and bringing it back to the senate floor. that came out today that your cosponsor pat toomey says no i'm done with it. do you
at least 20 killed in iraq as security forces break up a large antigovernment protest. hello there. you're watching al jazeera live from doha all. also on the program -- a car bomb explodes in the hearts of the libyan capital, injuring two french embassy guards. threatens force against any chinese ships that arrived at a disputed set of islands. destination mars, thousands of volunteers sign up for one-way ticket to the red planet. a weeklong protest in northern iraq has ended in violence after police move to disburse them. at least 20 people killed. security forces moved in on the sunni demonstrators after surrounding them for four street days. army officials accused protesters of attacking several checkpoints in the area. meanwhile, one of the highest- ranking kurds and the iraqi government has been sacked. he has been the foreign minister of iraq for nearly a decade. mary l maliki replaced him on tuesday in response to an ongoing boycott by kurdish politicians -- nouri al-maliki replaced him on tuesday. the foreign minister will be replaced by maliki's deputy, a prominent shia m
. first, let me say that i'm pleased to anchor this progressive caucus on iraq with my colleague from california, congresswoman maxine waters. let me thank congresswoman waters, who's the founder of the out-of-iraq caucus. congresswoman waters had the vision and the determination to pull together members of the house who really needed some space, who needed to be able to provide legislative strategies and to beat the drum to end this war in iraq. the country owes congresswoman waters a debt of gratitude, and we thank you very much for that. i also want to acknowledge congresswoman lynn woolsey who retired from congress at the end of last year but who looms so large during the special order, giving her incredible leadership in working to end the war in iraq and to bring our troops home. she is and remains our sister in arms when it comes to working for global peace and security for our children, all of our collective work. it was no wonder that many observers called congresswoman waters, woolsey and myself the tried a, but it was congresswoman -- triad, but it was congresswoman woolsey
. a media crackdown, iraq suspends 10 satellite television channels. two policemen are shot outside the italian prime minister's office as the country's new government was sworn in. a school in the united states holds its first into racial prom nearly 60 years after the end of segregation. -- interracial prom nearly 60 years after the end of segregation. welcome to the program. the search for survivors after a building collapse in bangladesh has all but ended. heavy machinery has been brought in to begin the cleanup after an eight story illegal construction came down on wednesday. it is the deadliest disaster to hit the garment industry in the country. our correspondent was at the scene. >> hope of finding more survivors faded on sunday. officials leading the operation started using heavy machinery to remove piles of large concrete. it is no doubt disheartening for this man.e he is one of hundreds of volunteers searching for the debris for a sign of life. the building collapsed last let -- last wednesday, leaving thousands of garment workers trapped inside. >> i need glasses. i need
it. >> north korea is definitely going to pursue its nuclear capabilities. the re >>> iraq war, ten years later. >> one of the most symbolic images from the u.s. invasion of iraq was the toppling of the statue of saddam hussein in firdos square in central baghdad with an american flag draped is >> my captain comes over and has got like this package. he hands it to me tells me there is an american flag in there, y he is like show the boys the colors. >> after the showing of the colors, the statue was toppled. at the base of the statue, helping to pull it down, was iraqi blacksmith kazem al jabouri. al jabouri on that day was angry because the draped flag was not an iraq one. today he no longer lives in iraq but in beirut, lebanon, because baghdad is dangerous. and al jabouri's views on the war have radically changed. >> saddam hussein, he said, maybe held us 100 years back. but now we are pushed back almost 300 years. >> al jabouri now says if the statue of saddam still existed, he would re-erect it. >> chin understands why iraqis feel hopeless over the war. >> there would probably b
detectors to iraq and the man that made millions is bound for jail. the duchess of cambridge of which the birth of her first child, actively continuing her royal duties. she launched a counseling program for children whose lives have been blighted by a drug and alcohol misuse. >> blooming in the sunshine, the duchess in six months pregnant and very clearly showing her baby bump. not far from her thoughts as her dog. she was presented with a basket of treats. inside the school, she met some of the nursery joe ed rendell presented her with a card on their idea of what a princess likes. and then, a present. as patron of of action and duchess lost the -- launched the joint program to help children affected by attics. addiction needs to be broken. my hope is that through targeted care, these children will have the best possible start. >> a prime example of how the charities represented by the duchess of benefit individually from her attention. and also how together, they can work even more effectively. >> in business news, the technology giant reported today that the company's profits beat
's america's fault for not intervening immediately and that's why it's radicalized. but in iraq we intervened and in three short weeks, we destroyed saddam hussein's regime, roto rooted the military and dissolved the baath party and there was radicalization that went on for years and still going on. there are car bombs going off every day. the united states spent $1 trillion in iraq and couldn't get the outcome it wanted. >> woodruff: his point is -- >> neither in afghanistan. it's not going to happen in syria. this is a civil war in america's civil war, 750,000 americans were killed in a population of 34 million. syria's 24m, 100,000 have been killed so far. >> woodruff: let me bring it back -- >> in process cannot be solved by an outside power. >> woodruff: he is basically saying the u.s. cannot fix this. >> he is basically wrong. one this is not a civil war. it's a national uprising against almost after a century of dictatorship. the united states can help solve this by assisting this free and democratic movement that has risen in syria. in order to level the playing field, the regime of a
from iraq i've been in touch with for more than a year and a half. after the united states would not give him his visa, i asked him -- i told him about mutanabbi street and he wrote a poem and he wrote it in english, though he writes in, of course, in arabic. but this one he wrote in english. so i'll read it. one figure in the poem you should know, humbaba, which is an ogre, a monster of immemorial age. that was a special big garden, a forest, where all types of trees and flowers grew. the trees bending down gently flinging branches. our orchard grew like a crown on the sun's eyebrow. where did humbaba come from? his mother was just a cave, his father unknown. who made him a friend pretending guardian of the orchard. did those nice shrubs need fear to go begging for a garden and have humbaba in his treachery ilk. those plants and flowers were like books everyone could read, not cut and throw away. their different fantastic colors had formed our blood so our veins ran smoothly, our 7 wonders showed. then humbaba made a whirlwind of fire and snow. who crowned him king? who showed h
. the lessons we learned in iraq we learned in afghanistan. the u.s. military does not automatically make a peaceful situation. there is a limitation. the u.s. has a vault in providing humanitarian aid and figuring out what we can do to help this is the tough question. we do not want to be warning al qaeda. is openness on the house ought to potentially working with partner nations to arm the right set of rebels, but figuring those out remains elusive. rhetoric when it comes done to specifics, what should we do? you talked about in no-fly zone. the losses we would sustain is really pretty extensive. the rhetoric has been hotter. rhetoric is just as a list of over there as it is in the house and the white house. it is a very difficult situation. >> you mentioned the military. do you have any sense of what size and number would be involved? they are moving chemical weapons around. shouldmilitary absolutely not go in. making the situation better. it is something i completely reject. i do not think there is an of forests what size would be able to go in and bring peace to syria and secure the
wars in iraq and afghanistan, facing overwhelming circumstances. not only do they have specialized medical needs, but military personnel who served war zones are also at a greater risk for alcohol abuse, marital and family conflicts, domestic violence, drug abuse, chronic pain, and suicide. they experience high rates of incarceration and make up a disproportionate part of our homeless population in the united states. nearly 33% of adults, almost men, one served in the military. these complex challenges require the support of many across disciplines. our faculties have been in dialogue for well over six months to try to identify ways in which we can make a greater difference. andt lady michelle obama dr. joe biden have enlisted the support of programs throughout the united states into a program entitled joining forces. schools that have agreed to participate, including do, have pledged to educate people to care for veterans and servicemembers facing ptsd, depressants, and other healthcare problems. implement the best practices of care and disseminate the most current information rel
to any terror network overseas. he said they were motivated by the u.s. wars in iraq and afghanistan. and they learned their bomb making from an online al qaeda magazine. we've also learned the older brother bought two large motor kits from a new hampshire fireworks store in early february. also today, new photos show the two suspects in the middle of what -- that fire fight with police early friday morning that left the older brother dead. but the suspects' mother still insists there's no truth to any of the charges. >> i am mother. i have -- you know, i know my kids. i know my kids. i -- really, my kids would never get involved into anything like that. >> many questions remain, but every day we're learning more about how and why these young men allegedly committed these terrible crimes. joining me now is eugene o'donne o'donnell, professor and law of police study at john jay college of criminal justice. and michael isikoff. thank you both for being here. michael, do authorities think they have the suspect -- that they have -- that he's telling the truth about acting alone? do they
fatalities is not a huge terror incident, in global terms at all. the same day, 65 people were killed in iraq by a single bomb. >> we did grow up in england, you had the ira. it was all over the place. i absolutely understand what you're saying. i do, however, am still obsessed in what are hyper-security conscious world. i cannot believe that this guy was on a cia watch list. i cannot believe it. and he slipped through the cracks. and anybody -- how come when we do googling or this or thatting and, you know, if we do a suspicious word or whatever, you can latch onto it. these guys had terrorists jihad officials. how come it didn't trigger anybody? >> because we happen to live in a free country. >> what i find amaze about them is they just went home! what do you mean? back to classes? working out? >> that's why i don't think we are going to find an extremely sophisticated conspiracy. this was a pretty bumbling operation. now, i don't mean to minimize the damage they did. but they obviously had no escape plan. >> there's obviously now a lot of politics swirling around the this, but you're herin
the iraq war to his tax cuts. social security reform to the wall street bailout and one of the largest expanses of the federal government in decades, homeland security. the library has been designed to challenge the conventional wisdom on his presidency. but will the public listen? the republican party is still struggling to deal with the aftermath of the bush presidency. president obama has successfully run against his predecessor not once but twice. many argue that without president bush there would never have been a president obama, just like without president carter there would not have been a president reagan. so we will watch it now. but the gop needs a george w. bush again. they need him to begin to repair his image. by the way, if he does want to run for president in 2016 then his brother jeb really, really needs this. when the republican party outlined its problems after the 2012 election the things rnc chairman reince priebus called for harkened back to a republican party george w. bush tried to usher in in 2000. modernize iize conservatism. "meet the press's" moderator davi
should the lessons of iraq weigh on the obama team's thinking? with us this morning ranking member of the senate armed services committee, arizona republican john mccain. >>> then the terror debate after boston. should more have been done to track the suspects when red flags were raised? a debate between republican congressman peter king of the intelligence and homeland security committee, and democratic congressman of minnesota, keith ellison. >>> also this morning, perspective on the threats testing the president, from former british prime minister tony blair. and our roundtable this morning includes democratic senator amy klobuchar as the group reflects on the bush library dedication this week and reacts to the president's big saturday night with washington journalists. >>> and good sunday morning. washington is bleary-eyed after what's come to be known as nerd prom in our nation's capital where politicians, celebrities, journalists, all mingle for a night of bipartisan fun. the president finding way to poke fun at washington's disarray. >> i know republicans are still sorting o
committing an insufficient number of troops in the beginning and redirecting america's energies to iraq, his policies created a vacuum that enabled the taliban to resurface. the second explanation for what went wrong is that president barack obama correctly shifted america's focus back to afghanistan but failed to fully resource the mission and wrongly fixed a date for ending combat involvement. although both answers have a great deal of merit, the project decreed a viable, seblized and legitimate afghan government may have been doomed from the very beginning. debates about the war in afghanistan often mirror debates about the war in iraq. we get wrapped up in procedural questions about planning and execution and we appeal the counterfactuals of if home we did this or that differently. but we rarely challenge the underlying assumption that we could have ever promoted national reconciliation, lasting peace or built a capable and popular government. in addition to what seems to be an unquestioned faith about our abilities in afghanistan, both the bush and obama administrations promoted the bel
. and phil donahue on iraq. the war that got him fire for being right. today is the president of kofi annan, and hank aaron hit his 715th home run to pass babe ruth's record and his memory lives on for those of us who don't believe in steroids. this is vow. "viewpoint." [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> good evening i'm john fugelsang and this is "viewpoint." with the senate back in session this could be the month maybe even the week when a new gun control bill is brought up to the floor. in connecticut an impassioned president obama kept up the pressure for up and down votes including universal background checks, ban on assault weapons and limits on multi round ammunition clips. >> this is not about me. this is not about politics. this is about doing the right thing for all the families who are here that have been torn apart by gun violence. it's about them and all the families going forward so we can prevent this from happening again. >> john: mr. obama met with members of 11 families who lost children in the sandy hook school, and then gift them a lift--thingave--thengave them a lift when it was done
a war of choice in iraq, to torch prisoners, to conduct secret wire tapping, nor was there talk about the financial crisis, the mortgage meltdown or hurricane katrina. will this country turn a blind eye to one of our great cities? that's the legacy and we can't ignore it. even or especially on a day like today. joining me now are join walsh and e.j. dionne. thank you both for being here tonight. >> thanks, rev. >> e.j., has the gop ever really had an honest reckoning of the bush years? i mean, what he did to this country and to their party? >> i think the short answer is no. ironically, the -- to the extent that the republicans are being critical of bush, they have been critical of him for being a big spender. they don't tend to note that a lot of that money was spent in iraq. but i'm not all that concerned that americans are going to forget that legacy. yes, president bush's numbers have improved since he left office, as we saw in "the washington post" poll, abc poll this week. his approval rating went from 33 when he left office to 47 now. but a majority of americans still remember
's legacy, including his support of the war in iraq. beatrice says, "only republicans still support the war in iraq" and hurley writes, trillions things of changed and we're getting rid of bush's policy. first, we want to hear what you think, too. please head over to facebook and search "politicsnation" and "like" us to join the conversation that keeps going long after the show ends. >>> how serious is the gop? serious enough that president obama became the first sitting president ever to address planned parenthood. giving a speech in support of women's rights. >> so when they tried to turn planned parenthood into the punching bag, they are not just talking to you, they are talking to the millions of women who have been served and are trying to roll back basic rights when it comes to women's health. you want to make sure you're still living in 2013. >> the year is 2013. but republicans are trying to roll back the clock. last year, 42 states passed laws to restrict abortion. and already this year, 326 proposals have been introduced that would restrict a woman's right to choose. president oba
that they have used it and do have the capabilities. there's some question after, as we know, iraq, how that had gone. there's questions in senators' minds, i believe. when you watch the whole thing unfold in syria right now, we look at syria from the standpoint, do we send troops in? there's people advocating that. do we have give all the support to our allies there, the neighbors of syria, that have the most to leave. the refugee problem is a tremendous concern to all of us. with all that being said, i would not support boots on the ground. i do support, totally support, any way else as far as humanitarian aid to jordan and -- >> intervene militarily, if no boots on the ground, no-fly zone, no -- >> we coordinate with nato and our neighbors and allies. i really believe that. >> finally, senator manchin, you and fellow republican senator pat toomey, were the coauthors of this expanded background check that was voted a downfew days ago in the senate. you're talking -- you're talking about revising the bill, bringing it back to the senate floor. it came out today that your cosponsor, pat timey sa
of conflict. >> but, senator, as the bush library was dedicated this week, again the specter of iraq and the legacy of iraq was debated in this country, are we not more skeptical about talk of more limited military action, no-fly zones, incrementalism, as you say, as well as the strength of the opposition? aren't there lessons from iraq that need to be taken into mind here? >> well, one of the lessons obviously, and we hear this a lot from the administration, is that we had false information about weapons of mass destruction with iraq. in this case, there is significant evidence that the -- physical evident of the use of chemical weapons, and by the way, the administration has said, well, they want the u.n. to investigate. the only problem with that is bashar won't let the u.n. in, so it's a bit ludicrous. so the fact is that whether he has used those chemical weapons or not, he's done virtually everything else -- atrocity you could commit, and that should not be the gauge. but would anyone be surprised if bashar al assad did use chemical weapons in his desperation to hang on to powe
that happened in iraq where we are unable to come to an agreement on troop community that might require us to pull all our forces out by the end of next year? >> it is a very big concern i have a. i just came back. i was over there a few weeks ago. onwere having our briefings saturday. is your only their two days. you really have to make use of your time. -- you are only there to days. you really have to make use of your time. he came in early. he gave us a briefing. he pretty well laid things out where the war effort is going pretty good. by the turned over 80% operations to the afghans. i was able to visit a couple of the areas. we have afghan in charge in those areas. to americans are moving back advisory positions. he said that is all moving very well. maybe we should be able to turn over just about all of the operations to the afghans. his number one priority is this bilateral action. >> why is it so hard? if the plans are going as we have drawn them up, what is it so hard to meet -- reach an agreement with president karzai? >> there is more that goes into that agreement and the numb
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